Seemannia
Seemannia purpascens 'Bolivian Form' - I have to say these are absolutely one of the most bizarre and beautiful plants I have ever seen.  
There are few plants that have the red or purple of this plant.  It grows easily in the shade and as you can see above blooms quite well. The
plant above left is in a mixed pot , it has proven to be quite adaptable and fairly cold tolerant (down to about 25 degrees Fahrenheit during two
winters).  Jonathan E. gave me the cutting several years ago, that all of my plants are descended from.
@copyright Brad Walker March 29, 2014
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Above - Seemannia gymnostoma - incredible plant large and fuzzy with bright lavender flowers.  The plant on the left is growing in mixed pot
including
Achimenes 'Red Elfe', they have been in this pot for 2 years and get bigger and better every year.  Jonathan E. gave me cuttings of
this several years ago that all of my plants are descended from.
Above - Seemannia nematanthodes 'Evita', is a selection of the species.  It was given to me
with the wrong identification, but when it bloom I knew it wasn't a
gloxinopsis.  It is a beautiful
plant with bright orange bloom with a yellow throat.

      I have S. nematanthodes from seed, as well as the red leaf variety.  I also purchased
another plant that was labeled 'Evita' but has a lot more yellow in the bloom.
Above - S. purpurascens 'Purple Prince' - a John Boggan hybrid between to different wild forms of S. purpascens.  It has dark leaves and pink
flowers with green lips.  I bought it in spring 2013 and it bloomed a month later and bloomed all summer.  It is different from the other form of
purpurascens that I grow, but I do enjoy the contrast and people do stare at it.
 Seemannia is a group of rhizomatous plants from the Central & South American Andes.  They are very easy to grow and flower freely.  When I first joined the
"Tennessee Gesneriad Society" Jonathan E. gave me a cutting of
Seemannia purpascens 'Bolivian Form' and the next year a cutting of Seemannia gymnostoma, they
rooted and I have lots of them every year.

 I grow all four of the species
purpascens, gymnostoma, sylvatica and nematanthodes.  They are large plants that like big pots to spread their roots and rhizomes.  
They make a fantastic show on their own or with companion plants as you can see below.  I have several mixed pots of them with larger plants and they bring color
whether through blooms or the incredibly reddish hairy leaves of
purpascens.

I grow them in 31/2 inch pots or larger in Miracle-Gro potting soil, that is changed every year.  The rhizomes need to be dug every year to divide them or they will
overflow from the pots (also increases rhizomes).